Barely visible from the roadside, hidden behind a large wooden archway opens up a Mediterranean courtyard. Olive trees Hortensia and fragrant herbs decorate uncountable terracotta pots in the two patios, the barn and the gallery – the former cow shed in a striking fashion.

The historic, landmarked, largely abandoned vineyard from the 18th century has been rebuild decoratively and with great historic detail in no more than 5 years. It provides Erk Kanis and his wife Birgit Hagenburger with the space for their pottery manufacure since 1997.

The trained under water archaeologist would have never dreamed of learning the trade of “turning” large terracotta vases and amphora in a workshop in Athens one day. Today imported Terrakotta Vases und Amphorae fill is workshop as much as his own collection of pottery. His very robust and lasting raw material is a self compiled mix of grey clay from the Westerwald and white clay from Greece.

His preferred workspace is in the large wine pressing room (Kelterraum) in the former vineyard.  That is where he can enjoy forming the large terracotta pots – in fact the larger the better – in all peace. The large selection is complemented by terracotta ceramics from traditional artisanal small workshops in Sicily, Crete and Tuscany. A specialty are the storage amphorae from Greece, designed from historic templates and up to 3.5 meters high. They astonish their viewers and create special highlights in large and small gardens. Also on display for enthusiasts of particularly valuable ceramic antiquities are carefully restored stone and ceramic jewellery. The magical ambiance alone is worth a visit.

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